A ticket to the 5th century BCE - Mtskheta, Georgia

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Mtskheta, the fascinating heritage and place of influential landmarks of Georgia. It was the ancient capital of the Eastern Georgian Kingdom from the 3rd century BCE to 5th century CE; the location where Christianity was proclaimed as the kingdom’s official religion and continents to function as the headquarters of the Georgian Orthodox Church. Here, you can find a ticket to the 5th century BCE and travel all the way through to mid-antiquity. 

Mtskheta, the fascinating heritage and place of influential landmarks of Georgia. It was the ancient capital of the Eastern Georgian Kingdom from the 3rd century BCE to 5th century CE; the location where Christianity was proclaimed as the kingdom’s official religion and continents to function as the headquarters of the Georgian Orthodox Church. Here, you can find a ticket to the 5th century BCE and travel all the way through to mid-antiquity.

  1. Jvari Monastery

Jvari translated as “The Monastery of the Cross”, is a 6th Century Monastery. It is located on a mountaintop with a great view of the meeting between the Mtkvari and Aragvi rivers as well as the entire city of Mtkskheta. Jvari is the one of the best place for those looking for travelling back in time and enjoy the architecture of the middle Ages.

Georgia, Tbilisi jvari monastery

  1. Svetitskhoveli Cathedral

Svetitskhoveli Cathedral is UNESCO World Heritage listing because of its glorious architecture. It was the religious centre for all Christians for many centuries. There is one legend that a seamless robe of Jesus Christ is buried within the temple. Another legend states that King Giorgi ordered the hand of amputated Svetitskhoveli’s architect, so that he could never recreate something so beautiful ever again.

Georgia, mtskheta svetitskhoveli monastery

  1. Samtavisi

A magnificent sample of Georgian medieval architecture dating back to the 11th century. Samtavisi has since been damaged several times by earthquakes, and was reconstructed both in the 15th and 19th centuries.

samtavisi georgia